MOTHAFUCKIN SHEEP DUDE
April 17 2014, 11:06 AM
April 17 2014, 10:32 AM

So this little cigarette right here has sparked a whole new brand of TFiOS hate, much of which is coming from people who claimed to love the book. 
Many people are now pointing out how “pretentious” Augustus is, and I can’t help but think, You’re only just now realizing this. He was written to be a seemingly pretentious and arrogant person. The acknowledgement of this is actually highly important because, without it, the book loses the message that a hero’s journey is that of strength to weakness. 
Augustus Waters has big dreams for himself. He wants to be known and remembered; he wants to be a hero; he wants to be seen as perfect. But there’s already something standing in his way… He has a disability, and society tells him that a person cannot be both perfect and disabled. So what does he do? He creates a persona for himself. He tries to appear older and wiser than he is. But the pretentious side of him is NOT who he truly is. It’s all an act. (This is evident in the fact that he often uses words in the wrong context.)
And when his cancer returns, we begin to see his mask cracking. The true Augustus begins to bleed through… Hazel even takes notice of this from time to time. And by the time we get to the gas station scene, Augustus is no longer the picture of perfection he was when we met him. The play has been canceled. The actor must reveal himself. And he’s revealed to be a weak, defenseless boy, succumbing to the cancer that is made of him. 
THE PRETENTIOUSNESS IS INTENTIONAL. It stands to show Augustus’s journey from flawless to flawed, from strong to weak. It’s the key to understanding that Augustus was the hero he always wanted to be, even if he didn’t realized it. 

So this little cigarette right here has sparked a whole new brand of TFiOS hate, much of which is coming from people who claimed to love the book. 

Many people are now pointing out how “pretentious” Augustus is, and I can’t help but think, You’re only just now realizing this. He was written to be a seemingly pretentious and arrogant person. The acknowledgement of this is actually highly important because, without it, the book loses the message that a hero’s journey is that of strength to weakness

Augustus Waters has big dreams for himself. He wants to be known and remembered; he wants to be a hero; he wants to be seen as perfect. But there’s already something standing in his way… He has a disability, and society tells him that a person cannot be both perfect and disabled. So what does he do? He creates a persona for himself. He tries to appear older and wiser than he is. But the pretentious side of him is NOT who he truly is. It’s all an act. (This is evident in the fact that he often uses words in the wrong context.)

And when his cancer returns, we begin to see his mask cracking. The true Augustus begins to bleed through… Hazel even takes notice of this from time to time. And by the time we get to the gas station scene, Augustus is no longer the picture of perfection he was when we met him. The play has been canceled. The actor must reveal himself. And he’s revealed to be a weak, defenseless boy, succumbing to the cancer that is made of him. 

THE PRETENTIOUSNESS IS INTENTIONAL. It stands to show Augustus’s journey from flawless to flawed, from strong to weak. It’s the key to understanding that Augustus was the hero he always wanted to be, even if he didn’t realized it. 

April 17 2014, 10:32 AM

So this little cigarette right here has sparked a whole new brand of TFiOS hate, much of which is coming from people who claimed to love the book. 
Many people are now pointing out how “pretentious” Augustus is, and I can’t help but think, You’re only just now realizing this. He was written to be a seemingly pretentious and arrogant person. The acknowledgement of this is actually highly important because, without it, the book loses the message that a hero’s journey is that of strength to weakness. 
Augustus Waters has big dreams for himself. He wants to be known and remembered; he wants to be a hero; he wants to be seen as perfect. But there’s already something standing in his way… He has a disability, and society tells him that a person cannot be both perfect and disabled. So what does he do? He creates a persona for himself. He tries to appear older and wiser than he is. But the pretentious side of him is NOT who he truly is. It’s all an act. (This is evident in the fact that he often uses words in the wrong context.)
And when his cancer returns, we begin to see his mask cracking. The true Augustus begins to bleed through… Hazel even takes notice of this from time to time. And by the time we get to the gas station scene, Augustus is no longer the picture of perfection he was when we met him. The play has been canceled. The actor must reveal himself. And he’s revealed to be a weak, defenseless boy, succumbing to the cancer that is made of him. 
THE PRETENTIOUSNESS IS INTENTIONAL. It stands to show Augustus’s journey from flawless to flawed, from strong to weak. It’s the key to understanding that Augustus was the hero he always wanted to be, even if he didn’t realized it. 

So this little cigarette right here has sparked a whole new brand of TFiOS hate, much of which is coming from people who claimed to love the book. 

Many people are now pointing out how “pretentious” Augustus is, and I can’t help but think, You’re only just now realizing this. He was written to be a seemingly pretentious and arrogant person. The acknowledgement of this is actually highly important because, without it, the book loses the message that a hero’s journey is that of strength to weakness

Augustus Waters has big dreams for himself. He wants to be known and remembered; he wants to be a hero; he wants to be seen as perfect. But there’s already something standing in his way… He has a disability, and society tells him that a person cannot be both perfect and disabled. So what does he do? He creates a persona for himself. He tries to appear older and wiser than he is. But the pretentious side of him is NOT who he truly is. It’s all an act. (This is evident in the fact that he often uses words in the wrong context.)

And when his cancer returns, we begin to see his mask cracking. The true Augustus begins to bleed through… Hazel even takes notice of this from time to time. And by the time we get to the gas station scene, Augustus is no longer the picture of perfection he was when we met him. The play has been canceled. The actor must reveal himself. And he’s revealed to be a weak, defenseless boy, succumbing to the cancer that is made of him. 

THE PRETENTIOUSNESS IS INTENTIONAL. It stands to show Augustus’s journey from flawless to flawed, from strong to weak. It’s the key to understanding that Augustus was the hero he always wanted to be, even if he didn’t realized it. 

April 17 2014, 10:12 AM

patrickshrimp:

bandsbooksinternet:

I made a thing

It’s a beautiful thing

April 17 2014, 09:55 AM

andreashettle:

justrollinon:

I’d love it if they stopped using the phrase “despite their disabilities”

image

Oh, gosh, I would love this too.

Ever notice that 99 percent of the time someone uses the phrase “despite their disabilities, they’re talking about something that isn’t even affected by the disability in the first place?  Like praising a deaf student for being good in calculus (what, do they think that all math is done via sound? Or that we do math with our ears?).  Or praising a wheelchair rider for doing their shopping (at a wheelchair accessible grocery).  Etc.

Most of the time they use phrases like “despite”, particularly when used in contexts where the disability doesn’t have the relevance that the person seems to think … that can only be read as a compliment if you are operating on the assumption that disabled people are helpless, passive creatures who can never be competent or do anything except sit there and wait for the benevolent charity of others.

April 17 2014, 09:41 AM

I met my wife at a Star Trek convention. She was study abroad from France and spoke little English, and I didn’t know a lick of French. So, for the first few months of our relationship, we communicated by speaking Klingon.

 -

Hear more tales of nerdery in this week’s Pwn Up! (via dorkly)

Okay I’m not even a Star Trek fan but that’s beautiful.

(via tchy)

April 17 2014, 09:40 AM

hawberries:

Hey folks! Are you ready for Retcons? (Are you really? ⊙‿⊙✿) (because i drew the cover and im not ready)

 The Posterchildren is a YA superhero book series with an emphasis on LGBTQ+ and minority issues and you should click here to learn more! It contains quips, puns, butt-kicking ladies, and more tacky capes than you can shake a stick at.

April 17 2014, 09:16 AM
April 17 2014, 08:22 AM

manamana6672:

missespeon:

outofcontextarthur:

can we talk about how this fucking pbs show aimed at little kids easily talked about how anxiety is stressful but normal

Ok no but can we talk about this entire episode? 

It was called April 9th, and it was actually a response to the 9/11 attacks. It didn’t talk about the attacks themselves, but rather focused on teaching kids to deal with the all of the emotions that they might be feeling as a result. They set up a situation that might evoke similar emotions in children: a massive fire at the school.

Arthur’s dad was in the fire, so (as you can see above), Arthur is constantly worried about his dad’s safety.

Sue Ellen is grieving because her journal, which contained a huge amount of precious memories, was destroyed in the fire. Muffy is confused why she can’t just cheer Sue Ellen up by giving her a new journal.

Buster wasn’t at school that day, and feels confused and guilty that he isn’t sad about the fire like the other kids. He then befriends the school janitor, who has to retire due to an injury that, at his age, is pretty serious.

Binky actually saw the flames, and is constantly traumatized by the event. He doesn’t tell anyone because he feels like he would lose his tough-guy reputation if he admitted that he was scared.

The episode teaches kids that all of these emotions are perfectly normal and natural, that there’s not one right way to feel, and that even if it takes a while, things are going to be okay.

The thing that makes this show so great, in my opinion, is that it knows that kids are intellegent and strong enough to deal with these things if you present them in the right way. It doesn’t hide them, it doesn’t sugar coat them, it just presents them in a way that children can understand and shows them how to deal with them.

April 17 2014, 06:33 AM
ripcurlfro:

darkling-andy:

allthe-lights-inthe-sky:

iroh must secretly be british…

TEA ORIGINATED IN CHINA THOUSANDS OF YEARS BEFORE THE BRITISH EVER HAD IT. WHERE DO YOU THINK THE BRITISH GOT IT FROM?

Darkling-andy’s tag:   #TAKE YOUR SENSE OF ANGLO SUPERIORITY AND SHOVE IT IN A TOP HAT  

ripcurlfro:

darkling-andy:

allthe-lights-inthe-sky:

iroh must secretly be british…

TEA ORIGINATED IN CHINA THOUSANDS OF YEARS BEFORE THE BRITISH EVER HAD IT.
WHERE DO YOU THINK THE BRITISH GOT IT FROM?

Darkling-andy’s tag:   #TAKE YOUR SENSE OF ANGLO SUPERIORITY AND SHOVE IT IN A TOP HAT  

April 17 2014, 05:38 AM

heathyr:

this is my love letter to azlyrics for not being annoying as fuck like other lyric websites

April 17 2014, 04:44 AM

And what if you could go back in time and take all those hours of pain and darkness and replace them with something better?

Donnie Darko (2001) director Richard Kelly

April 17 2014, 03:49 AM

notfknapplicable:

IMPORTANT : I just wanna point out that its STEVE who gets the flirting started between him and Sam at the beginning of the movie.  Sam is just moseying around the mall, going for his run, and this hot guy continually blazes past him had just has to rub it in that he’s totally outrunning him.  And then it’s Steve who stops to chat, makes a teasing little comments, offers friendly competition, and then THIS SHIT RIGHT HERE.  “Oh, that’s how it is?”  Steve, you tryin’ to fuck.  We see right through you.

As the movie progresses, it’s always Steve that seeks Sam out.  He goes to the VA to visit him (just to visit, apropos of nothing), shows up at his fucking apartment when how does Steve know where Sam lives? 

Upon my initial viewing of Cap 2 I really saw it as Sam fawning over Steve, but when I think about it, they’re definitely in mutual like but it’s really Steve that’s got a crush on Sam.  Wants him in his life.  I think the fandom has caught on to this as well because the influx of fic I’ve been reading features a lot of Steve being the aggressor towards Sam, and I like that.  I love it.  I want some more of it.